Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 27th Surgical Nursing & Nurse Education Conference Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Ozge Akbulut

Sabanci University, Turkey

Keynote: Silicone-Based Composites as Surgical Breast Models For Oncoplasty Training

Time : 9:00 - 9:45

Surgical Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozge Akbulut photo
Biography:

Dr. Akbulut is an Assistant Professor at Sabancı University, Istanbul, since February 2012. She received her B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering at Sabancı University in 2004. Her PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, 2009) focused on cost-effective fabrication of biomolecular devices and surface science. She continued her studies as a post-doctoral fellow in Whitesides Group at Harvard University (2009–2011) on developing tools/techniques for resource-limited settings. Dr. Akbulut’s current research interests are rheology modifiers and silicone-based composites. She also founded a company, Surgitate, on tactile surgical training platforms, in 2014

Abstract:

Surgical stuff-in-training necessitate practice to improve their skill sets and the shift towards simulation-based trainings enables trainees to learn at their own pace and experience custom-based cases rather than responding to the immediate needs of the patients. Oncoplasty for breast cancer encompasses tumor removal and subsequent breast reconstruction; and there are several oncoplastic techniques to master for proper treatment of the patients. For training purposes, closest media to reality, fresh cadavers, are hard to obtain due to their price and/or unavailability. There is a need for a sustainable, reliable, and affordable platform to diffuse simulation-based trainings to medical curricula and provide trainings even in resource-limited settings. Silicone-based composite models can be designed and manufactured to fulfill the necessities of breast surgery such as precise incision, epidermal undermining, suturing, and resisting suture tension after excision of a considerable mass. We have shown the performance of such a stand-alone breast model for two oncoplastic techniques, “Batwing Mammoplasty” and “Modified Inferior Flap Rezai”.  This model can be used in settings where it is difficult and/or expensive to find fresh cadavers. This cost-effective and practical solution also eliminates the need for chemical/cold storage and risk of infections/molding, thus making it a preferable tool for teaching hospitals and also for individual practice.  In addition, the model is suitable to be used in self-diagnosis trainings, as well as a communication platform between medical stuff and patients.

Keynote Forum

Lorraine McInnis

Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, UAE

Keynote: Transforming a Multinational Nursing Unit Into One Cohesive Team

Time : 9:50 - 10:35

Surgical Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lorraine McInnis photo
Biography:

Lorraine has been a perioperative nurse for over 27 years and has worked on all three coasts of Canada. She has fulfilled multiple nursing roles throughout her career and has presented at both  national and international conferences on various topics for the Perioperative Environement. This is her first experience working in another country.

Abstract:

This presentation will share the lessons learned; the success and challenges experienced by the Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi (CCAD) Perioperative Leadership team in uniting 15 different nationalities and cultures into one cohesive, high performing patient care team.

CCAD is the first Academic Medical & Research Centre in the UAE. A total of 75 different nationalities comprise the caregiver population at CCAD. With 15 different languages and the accompanying accents, misunderstandings through verbal communication and body language, is a constant hazard.

CCAD has been open to patient care since February 2015 and within this ‘start-up’ environment, change is the common theme on all levels throughout the organization. A primary goal for the perioperative team is harnessing the experience, knowledge and enthusiasm of so many different caregivers and channeling it into one consistent way of caring for our patients and families. Adding to the complexity of working with a multinational group, is the intricacy of providing care for the unique and  multifaceted  Emerati culture.  These amazing people are our patients, families and co-workers and willingly share their world with us every day

Creating and implementing the CCAD way through evidence based practice, AORN Guidelines, Hospital Policy, Unit Based Practice Councils and Education, we continue to grow into ourselves, building our future and striving for excellence in our care..

  • Session:
    Cardiac surgery | Surgical Oncology Nursing | Nursing Education | Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery | Assisting in Surgery | Intensive and Critical Care Nursing | Advancements in Nursing Education
Speaker
Biography:

Ayla Yavuz Karamanoğlu as a teaching assistant at Pamukkale University Faculty of Health Sciences, Surgical Nursing Department. She worked as a nurse at Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Medicine between the years 1988-1998. She worked in the urology clinic. She has completed her PhD at Ege University Health Science Institutes on surgical nursing.  Her doctoral dissertation: “Urinary incontinence experiences of patients after radical prostatectomy”.Using quantitative and qualitative data to identify the difficulties patients experience due to urinary incontinence.

Abstract:

This mixed type study in which qualitative and quantitative methods were used together was performed to determine urinary incontinence experiences of patients after radical prostatectomy. The data of the research were collected by interviewing 44 patients with 6 focus groups. Data were collected by using a questionnaire form containing identifying information of patients, semi-structured focus group questionnaire form, incontinence quality of life scale, and short-form of consultation on international urinary incontinence and incontinence impact questionnaire form.

It was determined as a result of the statistical analysis performed that patients' urinary incontinence quality of life was moderate. The difference between patients' age groups, post-operation durations, status of taking measure, using equipment and underpads and the mean scores of quality of life was found statistically significant (p<0.05). A total of six focus-groups interviews, being early, middle and late phases, were performed considering post-operation time period. A total of four (4) themes, namely, half-human, an unpleasant job, surviving as great prize and social isolation, was identified as a result of the study. It was observed that most of the patients felt themselves physically inadequate due to urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction developed postoperatively and they were informed about these matters by their physicians. It was found out that patients took advantage of Kegel exercises in recovering continence and pads and similar materials in coping with urinary incontinence. It was observed that they experienced social isolation due to urinary incontinence in early postoperative period. It was determined that patients experienced physical, psychological and social difficulties due to urinary incontinence in the early postoperative period and that their lives were affected adversely. It was discovered that incontinences of patients in the late postoperative phase decreased, but their sexual life-related problems continued.

Speaker
Biography:

Caroline Zulu conceptualised the research proposal, designed the research proposal in terms of stating the problem, designing the methodology, collecting and analysing data, wrote the report by presenting and discussing the findings. She refining the proposal, logically arranging the research report on research findings and wrote the report and discussion of findings has her expertise in education of public health nursing and passion in improving the health and wellbeing of communities through improving nursing education. She has had many years of experience in research, evaluation, teaching and administration both in nursing education and public health institutions. She is a lecturer at the University of Zambia, School of Nursing and wishes to make a difference to the nursing profession by increasing the body of scientific evidence based information on matters that affect nursing education and the profession as a whole. She has the zeal to improve the profession.

Abstract:

The image of both nurses and nursing as a profession are vital in the successful recruitment and retention of staff in the healthcare industry (Abdel EL-Halem, 2013). This exploratory descriptive study was conducted to establish the perception of the image of the nursing profession by nursing students at the University of Zambia. A total of 76 conveniently sampled students participated in the study. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire that comprised of three main parts to determine if students had either a positive or negative image of nursing profession, what could have influenced students’ perception  and students’ social ranking of the nursing profession. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20.

In Zambia, the shortage of Nursing is critical, for instance, the nurse patient ratio is 1 to 40 patients (Huffstutler, S., Y., et al. 1998). The findings showed that most (70%) of the students had a positive perception of the Nursing profession and 30% had negative perceptions of the image of nursing.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Benner’s Theory of Novice to Expert has yet to be used in application to Virtual Reality Clinical Education. Little evidence is available that discusses the benefits of Virtual Clinical Education to undergraduate students. This presentation will describe the benefits of Virtual Clinical Education through the application of Benner’s Novice to Expert theory in relating how theoretically such a learning activity may enhance the clinical performance and level of skill acquisition of undergraduate nursing students.

METHODS: After scrupulously examining Benner’s theory of Novice to Expert, research must be conducted in how virtual clinical simulation enhance the performance of undergraduate students. Therefore, the research questions based on this theory are as follows: In undergraduate nursing students enrolled in the domain of medical surgical nursing courses, how does participation in virtual clinical education affect such students’ perception of their ability to recognize aspects and attributes of a clinical situation, as well as, maxims and salient parts of such situations? Does participation in virtual clinical education develop perceived of competency and experience? Does student engagement in virtual clinical excursions as a learning activity allow them to perceive themselves as having reached the advanced beginner, competent, or proficient level of medical surgical nursing performance? This study will aim to describe the medical surgical student nurse’s conscious experience of virtual clinical education by exploring the aforementioned research questions. The meaning, structure, and essence of the lived experience of taking on the role of a nurse avatar during a virtual clinical excursion will be explored. The goal of the researcher is to gain access to the student nurse’s life or inner world and subjective experience. Data was collected by survey.

RESULTS: Most students perceived themselves to be an advanced beginner as a result of the VCS experiences. The highest levels of medical surgical nursing performance perceived were competent and proficient in two separate students. Students found the virtual environmental features of patient charts, patient avatars, medication administration records, and electronic health records to assist them in learning how to implement nursing care. It is said to supplement lectures in a dynamic case study format that is “more interesting than just reading information”. Students perceived it prepared them better for clinical experiences. Students are enabled to study the patient thoroughly and in a non-intimidating environment. An unexpected finding was that students reported they felt they would be better able to navigate patient charts and electronic health records as a result of the VCE experiences.

Students explained that the virtual clinical education experience would be useful if provided to students from the beginning of the semester so that they can integrate their experiences into true clinical practice. Virtual clinical education also is perceived to cause more effective transfer of knowledge in relation to critical thinking. Students perceive the simulated virtual clinical environment to induce less anxiety so they were provided “more time to think” so as to identify salient points of patient conditions. Students find the environment to be realistic possessing “all the aspects of the clinical experience minus the live bodies and interactions with patient, families, and the clinical team”.

CONCLUSIONS: Virtual clinical reality simulation is perceived by students to be a useful tool to facilitate their transfer of theoretical knowledge to practical knowledge. Nurse educators can attempt to cultivate the awareness of nursing students by presenting them with complex ill-defined, authentic tasks during virtual simulation scenarios. As a result, there is a shift that occurs so that students are able to retrieve relevant information and clinical reasoning occurs. This enables students to perform skills in the context of real world situations. Educators must strike a balance between teaching the cognitive base and enabling students with opportunities to put such knowledge to use, as situated learning theory encourages. As a result, clinical reasoning skills will be able to evolve. When virtual clinical simulation is used within nursing clinical education, a shift of nursing education’s paradigm from teaching to learning will truly occur.

Speaker
Biography:

Ingrid Gustafsson has been a registered nurse since 1991and worked at maternity ward, medicine and surgical wards, emergency department and with prehospital care. In 2008 she got her diploma as Nurse Anesthetist and has worked in the operating department in Vaxjo, Sweden. After a few years she left the hospital and is now working at Linnaeus University with the education to Nurse Anesthetist and is a doctoral student in caring sciences.

Abstract:

Background: When the body temperature falls below 36˚C during the perioperative period, mild hypothermia can develop. Between 46-77% of patients are affected. Patients with mild hypothermia have an increased risk of developing complication such as postoperative wound infection, pressure ulcers, shivering or requiring a blood transfusion. In order to prevent complications research has shown that the best practice is to maintain the patients´ temperature by using passive and active warming and also as early as possible in the perioperative period. The research also led to guidelines and algorithms to prevent mild hypothermia in some countries. However there is a lack about adherence to the recommended passive and active warming and if the nurse anesthetists´ have knowledge and access to them. The aim of this study is to investigate these areas. Methodology: Two questionnaires were used and data was analyzed with descriptive statistics. Findings: The nurse anesthetists’ have a high access to the recommended warming but their adherence was between 5-67 %. The most common reason why the patients did not get the recommended warming was due to short surgery. Approximately 60% of the nurse anesthetists have knowledge about the recommendations. More than half of the patients were in an operating room with a temperature below the lowest recommendation.   Conclusion: The access to the recommended warming was high and the adherence to them was mostly low. To reach higher adherence, the organization in the operating department have an important role when new recommendations should be implemented. By offering frequent education and ensuring their own guidelines will be readjusted by the new recommendations. It is also important that a key person is used as an advocate to implement the guidelines. It is imperative that the person with this role gets the appropriate time and resources to support them in this position.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Increasing the number of people with stoma (ostomate) in Indonesia due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer. Stoma causing problems of physical comfort, psychospiritual, social and environmental. This study aimed to see whether or not the relationship characteristics ostomate with physical comfort and psychospiritual. The method use cross sectional study conducted in 55 ostomate simple random sampling with a modified questionnaire Comfort Scale Kolcaba adaptation stoma. The results of this study are high comfort both physically psychospiritual 89.1% and 80.0%. Their relationship ostomate characteristics: complications with the physical comfort (p: 0.004)
and psychospiritual (p: 0.0018) and their relationship ostomate characteristics: location
stoma comfort psychospiritual (p:0045). Research shows that people living with a stoma
will affect comfort. Education and pre-operative stoma site at very important to
determine ostomate comfort in life after surgery.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Gawad Alwabr has obtained his PhD degree in Environmental Sciences in 2014. He is Assistant Professor of Public Health & Environmental Safety in Sana'a Community College, Yemen. He has worked in different projects in the field of Public Health and Environmental Safety. He has an interest in health education and increase society awareness about the public health and environmental safety. He also has a lot of interest in research work activity field.

Abstract:

Background: A needle stick injury is an accidental skin-penetrating stab wound from a hollow-bore needle containing another person's blood or body fluid. and can lead to the transmission of blood-borne pathogens, including hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The purpose of this study is to assess the level of knowledge and practice of needle stick injury preventive measures, and to estimate the incidence of exposure to needle stick injury among nurses working in the governmental hospitals in Sana'a city, Yemen. Methodology: A cross-sectional study among a random sample of nurses (n = 259) was conducted. A pre-tested structured self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 and the associations were tested with chi-square, with p-value of < 0.05. Results: One hundred and fourteen (44 %) respondents had poor knowledge of needle stick injury preventive measures, 75 (29%) had fair knowledge, and 70 (27%) had good knowledge. The knowledge was significantly associated with hospital's name (P < 0.017). One hundred and ninety-eight (76.5%) respondents had a poor practice of needle stick injury preventive measures, 23 (8.9%) had fair practice, and 38 (14.7%) good practice. There was a statistically significant association (p<0.001) between the knowledge and practice. Occupational exposure to needle-stick injury in the preceding 6 months was reported by 37.5% of the respondents, and 36.1% of them had needle-stick injury more than tow time. Only 1.4% of the affected individuals reported the occurrence to concerned hospital authorities. Although 48.6% of the respondents were vaccinated against hepatitis B. Conclusion: The practices and knowledge of needle stick injury preventive measures were low and occupational exposure to needle-stick injury was a common occurrence in the study sample. That's need for intensive programmes to educate nurses on various aspects of needle stick injury preventive measures.

Speaker
Biography:

Neelima Shakya has completed her M.Sc. in Medical-Surgical Nursing at the age of 29 years from B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. She is an Assistant Professor at Janamaitri Foundation of Health Sciences/ Little Angels’ College of Higher Studies. She has worked in general surgical ward and Intensive Care unit in Manmohan Cardiothoracic Transplant and Vascular Center for about three years. In the field of research, she has done data collection and analysis, attended and presented in journal clubs, published an article as a co-author, presented in scientific session and has been serving as an assistant professor.

Abstract:

Background and objectives: Surgery is a stressful situation hence patients should be provided with detailed information regarding their disease and management to ensure active participation. The objective of this study was to assess the information  received  by postoperative patients admitted in surgical units of BPKIHS and to find its association with selected variables.

Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study design was used to conduct the study. One hundred and twenty five patients were taken  using purposive sampling technique. Data was collected through interview questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 at confidence level 0.05.

Results: The mean age of the respondents was 39.98 ± 16.68 years with almost equal male and female. Thirty six percent had secondary level education. The total mean percentage information score was 63.41±10.77 with highest score on wound care (78.84± 10.78) and least on pain management (32.96± 21.21). Fifty eight percent perceived that information received was adequate. Association was found between history of past surgery and adequacy of information on illness (p value= 0.025), surgery (p value= 0.016) and operating room details (p value=0.002). Information on ADL was associated with age (p value= 0.048), gender (p value= 0.05), history of past hospitalization (p value= 0.002), past surgery (p value= 0.008) and source of information (p value= 0.021). The overall information had association with length of hospital stay (p value= 0.001) and history of past surgery (p value= 0.007).

Conclusion: More than half of the respondents perceived that information received was adequate. Age, gender, history of past hospitalization, past surgery, length of hospital stay and source of information had effect on information received by the patients. Thus individual need based patient information is essential.

Key words: Adequacy of Information, Postoperative patients, Surgical Units

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Background
The current challenges facing healthcare systems in relation to the shortages of health professionals necessitate that mangers and leaders learn from the different leadership styles and staff empowerment strategies to create a work environment that encourages nursing staff commitment to their work and organization. The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of nurses’ perception of their manager’s leadership style and psychological empowerment on their organizational commitment in acute care units in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia.
Methods
Using validated survey instruments, we obtained data from staff nurses employed by the King bin Abulaziz Medical Center (KAMC), NGHA Hard copy questionnaires were distributed to 350 randomly selected nurses, of which 332 were completed resulting in a response rate of 95%. The three instruments used to obtain the data were (1) the 1997 Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ), formulated by Bass and Avolio, (2) the 1995 Psychological Empowerment Scale developed by Spreitzer, and (3) the 1997 three-Component Model of employee commitment developed by Meyer and Allen. Our research design was based on a theoretical model that conceptually links leadership, empowerment, and organizational commitment. The SPSS program version 19 was employed to perform the descriptive and inferential statistics including correlation and stepwise multiple regression analysis.
Results
The overall results showed that most nurses perceived their immediate nursing managers as not displaying the ideal level of transformational leadership (TFL) behaviors. The nurses’ commitment appears to be negatively correlated with TFL style and perceived psychological empowerment whereas commitment is positively correlated with Transactional Leadership (TAL) style. Stepwise regression analysis showed that nurses’ commitment is significantly correlated with their nationalities by Region: North American (p-value = 0.001) and Middle Eastern (p-value = 0.027). The other important predictors of nurses’ commitment were: TAL (p-value = 0.027), Laissez-faire Leadership (LFL) (p-value = 0.012), and autonomy (p-value = 0.016). The linear combination of these predictors explains 20% of the variability of the nurses’ commitment.
Conclusion
The study findings suggest that leadership styles and employee empowerment play an instrumental role in promoting organizational commitment of nurses working in acute health care settings, at least in the Saudi Arabian context.
Keywords: Transformational leadership, Transactional leadership, Organizational commitment, Psychological empowerment.